Phase 1: Receive

This person is new to the subject of diversity and inclusion; they have probably heard about it on the news or in meetings. They don’t understand why it is important in their life and work.

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Rebecca Woodmass
Phase 2: Recognize

Through content, conversation, or self-reflection, this person has realized how important inclusiveness and empathy is to their relationships and their life. This realization may be centered on a certain perspective or group of people, or it may be about inclusion in general.

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Rebecca Woodmass
Phase 3: Research

This person is making up for lost time. On the heels of their moment of realization, they experience a thirst for knowledge, and seek out as much information as they can to learn about perspectives other than their own, and how to be a good ally.

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Rebecca Woodmass
Phase 4: Feel

The user begins to truly empathize with people unlike themself. They may feel guilty and confused about past behaviour and decisions they made, and may even question their vocation, friendships, media consumption, and other facets of their life.

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Rebecca Woodmass
Phase 5: Connect

In search of support, inspiration, and perhaps even respite, they start to seek out relationships online and in real life with like-minded people - people who have also realized the importance of inclusion. They may join employee groups, task forces, and change social patterns.

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Rebecca Woodmass
Phase 6: Defend

Silence = Complicity, and our user is not about to be complicit. They begin to courageously speak out in defense of underrepresented people, both online and in real life. Speaking out solidifies their personal investment in the people they have newly learned about and empathized with.

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Rebecca Woodmass
Phase 7: Dream and Get Involved

This user takes concrete action to support underrepresented people, and upgrades their knowledge periodically on new concepts and current events. They understand that change takes time, and commit to longer-term community projects, relationship-building, and accountability.

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Rebecca Woodmass